What is robots.txt in WordPress?

WordPress Robots.txt Guide – What It Is and How to Use It
BOM stands for byte order mark and is basically an invisible character that is sometimes added to files by old text editors and the like. If this happens to your robots.txt file, Google might not read it correctly. This is why it is important to check your file for errors. For example, as seen below, our file had an invisible character and Google complains about the syntax not being understood. This essentially invalidates the first line of our robots.txt file altogether, which is not good! Glenn Gabe has an excellent article on how a UTF-8 Bom could kill your SEO.
WordPress robots.txt An example for great SEO
So, what should be in your WordPress robots.txt? Ours is very clean now – we block almost nothing! This means we don’t block our /wp-content/plugins/ directory, as plugins might output JavaScript or CSS that Google needs to render the page. And we also don’t block our /wp-includes/ directory, as the default JavaScript that comes with WordPress, which many themes use, lives there.We also don’t block our /wp-admin/ folder. The reason is simple: if you block it, but link to it somewhere by chance, people will still be able to do a simple [inurl:wp-admin] query in Google and find your site – just the kind of query malicious hackers love to do. Now, WordPress has (by my doing) a robots meta x-http header on the admin pages that prevents search engines from displaying them in search results, which is a much cleaner solution. In the past, we used to block our Yoast Suggest tool, because the dynamic results this creates once opened a spider trap. We’ve now found a different solution for that so blocking Suggest is no longer needed.
What is Robots.txt in WordPress & How to Optimize It for SEO
Search engine optimization is something that every website owner should take very seriously nowadays. Due to the fact that search engines are constantly improving their crawling strategies and becoming more and more sophisticated, SEO can often be quite a tricky task. While some methods like keyword usage and on-page SEO are familiar to many, other techniques are more obscure, yet equally important. Therefore, in this article we have decided to talk about robots.txt – one of the most controversial SEO tools.
The Complete Guide to WordPress robots.txt
This is an example of a very basic robots.txt file. To put it in human terms, the part right after User-agent: declares which bots the rules below apply to. An asterisk means the rules are universal and apply to all bots. In this case, the file tells those bots that they can’t go into your wp-admin and wp-includes directories. That makes a certain amount of sense since those two folders contain a lot of sensitive files.
How to Optimize WordPress Robots.txt File for Better SEO
I do recommend, however, that you disallow the readme.html file in your robots.txt file. This readme file can be used by someone trying to figure out which version of WordPress you’re using. If this is a person, they can easily access the file by just browsing to it. Plus, putting a disallow tag in can block malicious attacks.
What is robots.txt File in WordPress SEO — How To Edit robots.txt File
When a search engine bots come onto your blog, they have very limited resources to crawl and index your website. If they can’t crawl all the pages on your site in provided resources, they will stop crawling your website & this will hamper your indexing. Also, at the same time, there are so many parts of your website, that you don’t want search engine bots to crawl. For example, Wp-admin folder, WordPress admin dashboard (or) any other pages, which are not useful for search engines. Using robots.txt, you are directing search engine crawlers (bots), to not crawl such king of area of your website. This will not only speed up crawling your blog but will also help in deep crawling of your inner pages.
What is robots.txt File in WordPress SEO — How To Edit robots.txt File
When a search engine bots come onto your blog, they have very limited resources to crawl and index your website. If they can’t crawl all the pages on your site in provided resources, they will stop crawling your website & this will hamper your indexing. Also, at the same time, there are so many parts of your website, that you don’t want search engine bots to crawl. For example, Wp-admin folder, WordPress admin dashboard (or) any other pages, which are not useful for search engines. Using robots.txt, you are directing search engine crawlers (bots), to not crawl such king of area of your website. This will not only speed up crawling your blog but will also help in deep crawling of your inner pages.
How to Optimize WordPress Robots.txt File for SEO
Let’s start with the basic. Robots.txt file is a text file which instructs search engine bots how to crawl and index a site. Whenever any search engine bots come to your site, it reads the robots.txt file and follows the instructions. By using this file, you can specify bots which part of your site to crawl and which part to avoid. However, the absence of robots.txt will not stop search engine bots to crawl and index your site.
How to Set up Robots.txt for WordPress Websites
Just creating a website is not enough. Getting listed in search engines is the essential goal of all website owners so that a website becomes visible in SERP for certain keywords. This listing of a website and visibility of freshest content is mainly due to search engine robots that crawl and index websites. Webmasters could control the way in which these robots parse websites by inserting instructions in a special file called robots.txt.
How to Optimize WordPress Robots.txt file for SEO
Robots.txt file is a simple text file in root directory of your WordPress setup. This file has user specified set of instructions for Search Engine Bots. These instructions help Search Engines (Google, Bing etc.) to understand that where they are allow-ed to go while vising your site. Robots.txt also tells Search Engines the places that are disallow-ed for their visit. I will also talk about some certain things that you do not want Search Engines to crawl and index. Or in other words, you should not allow Search Engine bots to access vulnerable components of your website.
Where And How To Upload Robots txt file In WordPress Or Cpanel
But first, here is a little explanation of Robots.txt File for fresher. Whenever search engine crawls your site, It first looks at the robots.txt file and then checks all the command in it and move next. This file tells search engines what they should and should not index from your site. It also may indicate the location of your XML sitemap that helps you to the faster indexing of your website. Maximum bots follow this thumb rule, expected bots that are made for the hacking purpose. You can protect your website by applying protection layer on it.
WordPress Robots txt file! How To Create Configure And Optimized It
At last, be aware of the syntax of a command. A little mistake in the robots.txt file can block your entire site. Always test your file before upload it to the root of your site. After Adding uploading your file, monitor your traffic if you found nay peak change (decrease) in traffic. Then recheck your file and find the reason behind it.
Better Robots.txt Rules for WordPress
Because /wp-content/ and /wp-includes/ include some publicly accessible CSS and JavaScript files, it’s recommended to just allow googlebot complete access to both directories always. Otherwise you’ll be spending valuable time chasing structural and file name changes in WordPress, and trying to keep them synchronized with some elaborate set of robots rules. It’s just easier to allow open access to these directories. Thus the two directives above were removed permanently from robots.txt, and are not recommended in general.
Robots.txt
Whenever they come to a site, search engines and other web-crawling robots (like Facebook’s crawler, Facebot) know to look for a robots.txt file. But, they’ll only look for that file in one specific place: the main directory (typically your root domain or homepage). If a user agent visits www.example.com/robots.txt and does not find a robots file there, it will assume the site does not have one and proceed with crawling everything on the page (and maybe even on the entire site). Even if the robots.txt page did exist at, say, example.com/index/robots.txt or www.example.com/homepage/robots.txt, it would not be discovered by user agents and thus the site would be treated as if it had no robots file at all.